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Violence affecting children manifests differently in every society. The most effective interventions address both the immediate needs of children and the broader social causes of violence. The Multi Country Study on the Drivers of Violence Affecting Children, led by Innocenti and national partners in Peru, Zimbabwe, Viet Nam and Italy, builds national research capacity across the four countries. National reports and policy briefs synthesize findings to create a composite picture of violence. Field research tests if interventions to prevent violence are addressing the underlying drivers. An Advisory Board  provides advice and guidance for the Multi Country Study.  

Several countries neighboring the four main field sites have initiated the Research to Policy & Practice Process, called R3Ps.. These are scaled-down studies on the drivers of violence allowing UNICEF Country offices and partners to systematically review and prioritize best possible prevention and response interventions based on local evidence.

Young Lives is a longitudinal study following the lives of 12,000 children in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam over a 15 year period. The study measures the effect of violence on child outcomes at multiple points in time. Young Lives study data is powerful in suggesting when, where and how risk and protective factors manifest in children’s lives; this work complements the Multi Country Study findings and contributes to new understandings for violence prevention policy and programming.  

Violence affecting children manifests differently in every society. The most effective interventions address both the immediate needs of children and the broader social causes of violence. The Multi Country Study on the Drivers of Violence Affecting Children, led by Innocenti and national partners in Peru, Zimbabwe, Viet Nam and Italy, builds national research capacity across the four countries. National reports and policy briefs synthesize findings to create a composite picture of violence. Field research tests if interventions to prevent violence are addressing the underlying drivers. An Advisory Board  provides advice and guidance for the Multi Country Study.  

Several countries neighboring the four main field sites have initiated the Research to Policy & Practice Process, called R3Ps.. These are scaled-down studies on the drivers of violence allowing UNICEF Country offices and partners to systematically review and prioritize best possible prevention and response interventions based on local evidence.

Young Lives is a longitudinal study following the lives of 12,000 children in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam over a 15 year period. The study measures the effect of violence on child outcomes at multiple points in time. Young Lives study data is powerful in suggesting when, where and how risk and protective factors manifest in children’s lives; this work complements the Multi Country Study findings and contributes to new understandings for violence prevention policy and programming.  

LATEST PUBLICATIONS

This paper explores children’s accounts of violence in Andhra Pradesh, India, and the ways in which factors at the individual, family, community, institutional and society levels affect children’s experiences of violence. The paper analyses cross-sectional survey data and case studies from longitudinal qualitative data gathered over a seven-year period, from Young Lives.

AUTHOR(S)

Virginia Morrow; Renu Singh
After a brief description of the policy context and literature review, the paper describes the study then presents findings from the survey and qualitative research, exploring home, schools, communities, differences by age and gender, and children’s responses to violence. The report adds to knowledge about the nature and experiences of violence affecting children in resource-poor settings, and concludes with some suggestions for policies, programming and practice.

AUTHOR(S)

Alula Pankhurst; Nathan Negussie; Emebet Mulugeta
The paper discusses how living in poverty affects relationships between parents and children. Meeting the basic economic needs of a family is the priority for parents, who then have limited time, energy and resources to devote to their children. We also found that children exposed to violence in the home are also frequently exposed to corporal punishment at school.

AUTHOR(S)

Gabriela Guerrero; Vanessa Rojas
This paper explores children’s accounts of violence at home in Viet Nam, and the ways in which factors at the individual, family, community and society levels affect their experiences of violence. The paper analyses cross-sectional survey data and qualitative data gathered from Young Lives.

AUTHOR(S)

Thi Thanh Huong Vu
This study uses a mixed methods approach combining survey analysis of the predictors and associations with being bullied, with qualitative data to explore the context in which bullying occurs and the social processes that underpin it. Findings show that better data collection and increased resource allocation to bullying prevention are needed. The development and evaluation of different types of effective, sustainable and scalable bullying prevention models in low- and middle-income country contexts are priorities for programming and research.

AUTHOR(S)

Kirrily Pells; Maria José Ogando Portela; Patricia Espinoza Revollo
This Brief summarizes the proceedings of the Know Violence Roundtable examining the evidence on the role of social protection in reducing childhood violence hosted by UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti, 12-13 May, 2016.

AUTHOR(S)

Sarah Cook; Naomi Neijhoft; Tia Palermo; Amber Peterman
Over the past decade, more than a dozen government-run cash transfer programmes have been launched in sub-Saharan Africa as part of national social protection strategies. Recently there has been increased interest in examining whether such programmes reduce interpersonal violence, including between partners and against children. In this Research Brief we discuss different approaches that have been implemented in evaluations supported by the Transfer Project.

AUTHOR(S)

Tia Palermo
Globally the use of corporal punishment in schools is increasingly prohibited in law, yet in many contexts its use continues, even where outlawed. Proponents argue that it is an effective and non-harmful means of instilling discipline, respect and obedience into children, while others point to a series of detrimental effects, including poor academic performance, low class participation, school dropout and declining psychosocial well-being. Establishing whether corporal punishment has lasting effects on children’s cognitive development and psychosocial well-being has been hampered by a lack of longitudinal data, especially from Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

AUTHOR(S)

Maria José Ogando Portela; Kirrily Pells
There is growing interest in the role that restorative justice can play in addressing mass atrocities. This paper describes the associated principles and practices within juvenile justice systems and in societies emerging from mass violence. It also examines the meaning, opportunities and limitations of restorative justice in transitional societies, particularly in relation to the needs of young victims and offenders.

AUTHOR(S)

Laura Stovel; Marta Valiñas
How has the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) made a difference in the everyday lives of children, particularly those needing special protection? There have been reforms in law policy. There have also been resource allocations, an increase in the number of training and awareness raising programmes, and the development of plans of action for children. However, there is a lack of evidence of the impact of all these actions on the day to day lives of children.

AUTHOR(S)

Natasha Blanchet-Cohen
MORE PUBLICATIONS

Project team

Mary Catherine Maternowska; Alina Potts


Partner organizations

Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs - Italy

Ministry of Labour, Invalids and Social Affairs - Viet Nam

Ministry of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare - Zimbabwe

Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Population - Peru

University of Edinburgh. Moray House, School of Education

Young Lives International Study on Childhood Poverty


Blogs

Bringing data on violence out of the shadows in Peru: a 25 year journey

Investigating the drivers of violence affecting children in Vietnam

Can data help end corporal punishment?


Podcasts

Mary Catherine Maternowska on Peru making progress on violence against children


Journal articles

Violence Against Children in the Asia Pacific Region: The Situation Is Becoming Clearer

Prevalence of violence in childhood and adolescence and the impact on educational outcomes: evidence from the 2013 Peruvian national survey on social relations


Related external links

The Population Council - Adolescent girls' empowerment

Global Early Adolescent Study

The Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children

Know Violence In Childhood


RESEARCH WATCH

Violence against children: a silent threat


Programme summaries

Investigación para informar la política: El impacto del castigo fisíco en las escuelas en los resultados educativos y de bienestar de niños y niñas peruanos

Research to Policy and Practice Process (R3Ps): Overview

Research to Policy Brief: The impact of corporal punishment in Peruvian schools

The Multi-Country Study on the Drivers of Violence Affecting Children: Emerging Researchers

The Multi-Country Study on the Drivers of Violence Affecting Children: Overview

The Multi-Country Study on the Drivers of Violence Affecting Children: Research Uptake

Young Lives four-country analysis on child protection: risk and protective factors


Manuals, tools and guidelines

Understanding the drivers of violence. A step-by-step guide to conducting preliminary research around what drives violence

Why do people do what they do?


Conferences & Meetings

Social Protection and Childhood Violence: Expert Roundtable