KEEP UP TO DATE

CONNECT  facebook youtube pinterest twitter soundcloud
search advanced search

Cohort and longitudinal studies have unique potential to improve understanding of the dynamic processes that shape child development, including trends and trajectories. Because these surveys track individuals over time they can illuminate many aspects and stages of children’s lives, including unexpected events. They provide more of a film strip than a single image. Longitudinal studies bring a life-course perspective to analysis, and can contribute to understanding the drivers and determinants of child outcomes.

Through a series of activities, including establishment and coordination of the Global Longitudinal Research Initiative (GLORI), a network of 30 longitudinal studies, this project shares latest findings emerging from different longitudinal studies to explore what the next generation of knowledge from longitudinal studies will look like. It will identify how cohort studies can contribute to policy and research, identify gaps in knowledge and share lessons on the practice of longitudinal studies.

Cohort and longitudinal studies have unique potential to improve understanding of the dynamic processes that shape child development, including trends and trajectories. Because these surveys track individuals over time they can illuminate many aspects and stages of children’s lives, including unexpected events. They provide more of a film strip than a single image. Longitudinal studies bring a life-course perspective to analysis, and can contribute to understanding the drivers and determinants of child outcomes.

Through a series of activities, including establishment and coordination of the Global Longitudinal Research Initiative (GLORI), a network of 30 longitudinal studies, this project shares latest findings emerging from different longitudinal studies to explore what the next generation of knowledge from longitudinal studies will look like. It will identify how cohort studies can contribute to policy and research, identify gaps in knowledge and share lessons on the practice of longitudinal studies.

LATEST PUBLICATIONS

Longitudinal research can help countries meet the challenges of sustainable development. The examples presented in this Brief serve to demonstrate the unique advantages of having access to longitudinal studies to complement cross-sectional surveys and administrative series.The Brief reviews data from the Young Lives cohorts, reflecting on evidence from the 2000-2015 Millennium Development period.

AUTHOR(S)

Paul Dornan; Caroline Knowles; Prerna Banati
Globally the use of corporal punishment in schools is increasingly prohibited in law, yet in many contexts its use continues, even where outlawed. Proponents argue that it is an effective and non-harmful means of instilling discipline, respect and obedience into children, while others point to a series of detrimental effects, including poor academic performance, low class participation, school dropout and declining psychosocial well-being. Establishing whether corporal punishment has lasting effects on children’s cognitive development and psychosocial well-being has been hampered by a lack of longitudinal data, especially from Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

AUTHOR(S)

Maria José Ogando Portela; Kirrily Pells
Tackling poverty and inequalities is now embedded within the mandates of governments and organizations worldwide. UNICEF has been a leader on this, and concern about inequalities has also been picked up in the debates surrounding post 2015 development goals.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Paul Dornan; Martin Woodhead
MORE PUBLICATIONS