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Education

Work in the education sector adds to the global knowledge base on what factors improve school settings, how children experience pathways through the education system, and how schools and education systems contribute to the well-being of all children.

The Transforming Schools into Learning Organisations project aims to enhance the knowledge and understanding of change management and innovation capacity within schools and other levels of school systems, and the interacting dynamics of governance and support structures. The study is being undertaken in collaboration with the Education Directorate of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

The Sequencing in Child Well-Being study is a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies from across the globe that compare the influence of one child well-being factor on another. The purpose of this work is to open a discussion on how complementarities and co-dependence between child well-being goals might inform more wide ranging, cross-sectoral, policy responses to suites of social progress indicators/policy targets. The studies focus on pathways through education.

The Strong Schools Latin America and the Caribbean project will undertake a cross-national comparison of violence against school-children in the Latin America and the Caribbean region. The study reviews how experienced violence links to key goals for education systems (attendance, attainment and achievement), and assesses the policies and practices in the region designed to address the challenge. The study is being undertaken in collaboration with UNICEF’s Latin America and Caribbean Regional Office.

Education

Work in the education sector adds to the global knowledge base on what factors improve school settings, how children experience pathways through the education system, and how schools and education systems contribute to the well-being of all children.

The Transforming Schools into Learning Organisations project aims to enhance the knowledge and understanding of change management and innovation capacity within schools and other levels of school systems, and the interacting dynamics of governance and support structures. The study is being undertaken in collaboration with the Education Directorate of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

The Sequencing in Child Well-Being study is a meta-analysis of longitudinal studies from across the globe that compare the influence of one child well-being factor on another. The purpose of this work is to open a discussion on how complementarities and co-dependence between child well-being goals might inform more wide ranging, cross-sectoral, policy responses to suites of social progress indicators/policy targets. The studies focus on pathways through education.

The Strong Schools Latin America and the Caribbean project will undertake a cross-national comparison of violence against school-children in the Latin America and the Caribbean region. The study reviews how experienced violence links to key goals for education systems (attendance, attainment and achievement), and assesses the policies and practices in the region designed to address the challenge. The study is being undertaken in collaboration with UNICEF’s Latin America and Caribbean Regional Office.

LATEST PUBLICATIONS

Mental health is increasingly gaining the spotlight in the media and public discourse of industrialized countries. The problem is not new, but thanks to more open discussions and fading stigma, it is emerging as one of the most critical concerns of public health today. Psychological problems among children and adolescents can be wide-ranging and may include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), disruptive conduct, anxiety, eating and mood disorders and other mental illnesses. Consistent evidence shows the links between adolescents’ mental health and the experience of bullying. Collecting internationally comparable data to measure mental health problems among children and adolescents will provide important evidence and stimulate governments to improve psychological support and services to vulnerable children.

AUTHOR(S)

Zlata Bruckauf
Evidence from national studies in developed and developing countries suggests that girls spend more time on housework. The most common explanation relates to behaviour modelling as a mechanism of gender role reproduction: children form habits based on parental models. This brief shows that participation in household chores is an essential part of children’s lives. There is a common pattern of a gender gap between boys’ and girls’ daily participation in housework across a diverse range of socio-economic and cultural contexts in 12 high-income countries. The persistence of this gap points to gender stereotyping – a form of gender role reproduction within a family that potentially can reinforce inequalities over the life-course.

AUTHOR(S)

Zlata Bruckauf; Gwyther Rees
The attitudes that we hold are shaped and nurtured by society, institutions, religion and family; they involve feelings, beliefs and behaviours and represent a form of judgement. These attitudes and values define the power relations, dynamics, opportunities and choices between men and women, boys and girls. Societies vary significantly in the scale of egalitarian attitudes and beliefs related to gender roles and opportunities in education, politics, the family, and the workforce. Progress towards more egalitarian gender values is crucial for achieving gender equality among children and young people, which in turn is a pre-condition for sustainable development.

Early childhood development is a driving force for sustainable development due to its multiplier effects not only on children but also on the community and society at large. Access to ECEC alone is insufficient for achieving positive child outcomes – it must also be of high quality. This Brief aims to summarize the key points of ongoing debate on this issue, and outline some of the challenges faced by high-income countries. A step towards a more holistic monitoring of ECEC would be to develop a coherent national strategy that recognizes diversity while addressing disparities; to respond to the needs of both child and family through strong partnerships with parents and ECE practitioners; and to apply measurement tools that capture a child’s engagement rather than test readiness.

AUTHOR(S)

Zlata Bruckauf; Nóirín Hayes
Sexual violence against women and girls is widespread globally. In their lifetime, one in three women will experience intimate partner physical or sexual violence and 7 per cent will experience forced sex by someone other than an intimate partner.

Research is invaluable for contextualising online experiences in relation to children’s and families’ lives and the wider cultural or national circumstances. The Global Kids Online project aims to connect evidence with the ongoing international dialogue regarding policy and practical solutions for children’s well-being and rights in the digital age, especially in countries where the internet is only recently reaching the mass market.

Advocacy and action for adolescents have been hampered by the lack of a concrete results framework that can be used to describe the state of the world’s adolescents and serve as a basis for goals and targets. In order to fill this gap, UNICEF, in collaboration with key partners, is facilitating the development of an outcome-based framework that incorporates the key dimensions of an adolescent’s life and a proposed set of globally comparable indicators that will provide a common platform to track the progress of adolescent development and well-being. The domains that have been selected for measurement are: health and well-being, education and learning, safety and protection, participation, transition to work.

AUTHOR(S)

Prerna Banati; Judith Diers
The paper aims to reduce the global knowledge gap pertaining to the impact of disability on school attendance, using cross-nationally comparable and nationally representative data from 18 surveys in 15 countries that are selected among 2,500 surveys and censuses. These selected surveys administered the Washington Group Short Set (WGSS) of disability-screening questions, covering five functional domains of seeing, hearing, mobility, self-care, and remembering, and collected information on educational status.

AUTHOR(S)

Suguru Mizunoya; Sophie Mitra; Izumi Yamasaki
Tackling poverty and inequalities is now embedded within the mandates of governments and organizations worldwide. UNICEF has been a leader on this, and concern about inequalities has also been picked up in the debates surrounding post 2015 development goals.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Paul Dornan; Martin Woodhead
This initial exploratory study examines the governance and finance of Early Childhood Services (ECS) in three countries (Cambodia, Kenya and Lao People's Democratic Republic) using an in-depth qualitative approach. The methodologies and tools provide an innovative strategy built upon the literature of governance and finance to understand how to improve access, quality and equity of ECS.

 

Pia Rebello Britto; Hirokazu Yoshikawa

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Jan Van Ravens; Liliana A. Ponguta; Soojin S. Oh; Roland Dimaya; Richard C. Seder
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