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Child well-being, poverty and overlapping deprivation analysis in rich countries (Report Card 10)

Since 2000, UNICEF IRC has released 9 issues in the Innocenti Report Card series addressing different aspects of the living conditions of children and adolescents in economically advanced countries. All the Report Cards are built around a 'league table' which ranks countries according to their performance on key child indicator(s). From 2011 onwards the Report Card series will have 4 recurrent themes, which aim at providing a set of child poverty and deprivation monitoring instruments focused on rich (OECD) economies.

The cycle will include a multiple overlapping deprivation analysis, a multidimensional analysis of child well-being and analysis of children left behind with measurements of inequality. The series offers original and authoritative material in an interesting format to policy makers, academics, child rights defenders and the media and also provides support to National Committees.

The upcoming issue, Report Card 10, focuses on the direct experience of individual children under a multi-dimensional perspective and the extent to which deprivations occur simultaneously in multiple dimensions. The comparison of results of the child multidimensional poverty analysis and the child income poverty results will provide a better understanding on the concrete meaning of monetary poverty in the 30 countries included in the study (and eventually on the adequacy of their respective poverty lines).

Publications

The Child Care Transition: A league table of early childhood education and care in economically advanced countries
Publication Publication

The Child Care Transition: A league table of early childhood education and care in economically advanced countries

A great change is coming over childhood in the world's richest countries. Today's rising generation is the first in which a majority are spending a large part of early childhood in some form of out-of-home child care. At the same time, neuroscientific research is demonstrating that loving, stable, secure, and stimulating relationships with caregivers in the earliest months and years of life are critical for every aspect of a child’s development. Taken together, these two developments confront public and policymakers in OECD countries with urgent questions. Whether the child care transition will represent an advance or a setback for today's children and tomorrow's world will depend on the response.
Prospettiva sulla povertà infantile: un quadro comparativo sul benessere dei bambini nei paesi ricchi
Publication Publication

Prospettiva sulla povertà infantile: un quadro comparativo sul benessere dei bambini nei paesi ricchi

Questo rapporto presenta un'estesa analisi della condizione e del benessere dei bambini e dei giovani in 21 paesi del mondo industrializzato. Si pone l'obiettivo di favorire il monitoraggio, di consentire la comparazione e di stimolare il dibattito e lo sviluppo di politiche volte a migliorare la vita dei bambini. Lo studio si pone l'obiettivo di misurare e comparare il benessere dei bambini e dei giovani esaminandolo alla luce di sei parametri diversi: il benessere materiale, la salute e la sicurezza, l'istruzione, i rapporti con la famiglia ed i coetanei, i comportamenti e rischi, e la auto-percezione che essi hanno del proprio benessere.
Alternative Tax-benefit Strategies to Support Children in the European Union. Recent Reforms in Austria, Spain and the United Kingdom
Publication Publication

Alternative Tax-benefit Strategies to Support Children in the European Union. Recent Reforms in Austria, Spain and the United Kingdom

In this paper the situation of three EU countries that have recently experienced substantial but very different reforms of their systems to support families with children is analysed and compared: Austria, Spain and the United Kingdom. The structure of these systems is very different: Austria gives emphasis to universal benefits, Spain to tax concessions and the United Kingdom to means-tested benefits. Basically, the recent reforms have reinforced these structures in each country while increasing the amount of public resources directed towards children. However, are the chosen strategies the most adequate for each country? What would have happened to the economic well-being of children if instead of reinforcing the existing types of policies these countries had completely transformed the architecture of their systems in another direction? More concretely, what would be the effect on child poverty and on income distribution?