CONNECT
search advanced search
UNICEF Innocenti
Office of Research-Innocenti
search menu

Campaigns & microsites

Playing the Game

21 September 2021 Sport, recreation, and play are improving children’s health and wellbeing all around the world. Sport for development (S4D) harnesses the power of sport to help children improve their health and develop social, educational and leadership skills while playing and having fun. On September 21, 2021, UNICEF Innocenti launched phase II of the Sport for Development research to demonstrate how S4D can be used to help children around the world.

UNICEF Innocenti Film Festival 2021
Page Page

UNICEF Innocenti Film Festival 2021

To take stock of the dynamic forces shaping childhood and promote deep reflection on the experiences of children in different contexts, we are proud to announce the second UNICEF Innocenti Film Festival (UIFF) will be held 21 – 24 October 2021. UIFF will be presented in Florence, Italy through a mixture of live socially distanced screening programmes at Cinema La Compagnia and virtual screenings streamed on demand on MyMovies.it.
Reopening with Resilience
Page Page

Reopening with Resilience

1.6 billion students have been affected by school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although schools have started to reopen in 2020 and 2021, too many have remained closed for too long. Even short disruptions in schooling can have long-lasting impacts on children’s learning and wellbeing. The evidence is clear that there is no replacement for in-person learning and schools should reopen as soon as possible. This global school closure crisis has highlighted the need for resilient education systems with remote learning options that are accessible and effective for all learners when schools are forced to close.
Where do rich countries stand on childcare?
Page Page

Where do rich countries stand on childcare?

Accessible, affordable, and quality childcare helps parents return to work after parental leave, improves children’s social and cognitive development, and promotes a more gender equitable society. Yet, despite its many benefits, UNICEF Innocenti's report reveals that childcare is inaccessible to many parents in the world's richest countries. Where Do Rich Countries Stand on Childcare? ranks high-income countries based on their national childcare and parental leave policies. The best-performing countries combine affordability with quality of organized childcare while offering long and well-paid leave to both mothers and fathers.
Reimagining Migration Responses
Page Page

Reimagining Migration Responses

In the Horn of Africa, migration has long been a key coping strategy. Recently however, migration has been framed in terms of risk rather than opportunity. UNICEF’s new research captures the experiences of 1,290 migrant children and young people in Sudan, Ethiopia and Somalia to help paint a more accurate picture of migration in the region. This will in turn help ensure that they are better protected and supported.
Social Spending Monitor
Page Page

Social Spending Monitor

Realizing all children’s rights does not come for free. To achieve this indispensable goal, careful planning and budgeting are needed. Experience from past crises shows that social spending works to protect children. UNICEF Innocenti’s new series monitors, advocates for, and supports better social spending.
Discover the Best of UNICEF Research and Evaluation 2020
Page Page

Discover the Best of UNICEF Research and Evaluation 2020

(15 December 2020) Evidence and objective assessment are needed more than ever to help enhance the rights and well-being of the world’s children. Researching the changing world around us and evaluating progress are critical to reimagining a better future for children everywhere. In recognition of this, the Best of UNICEF Research and Evaluation 2020 celebrates and showcases innovative and influential research and evaluations from UNICEF offices around the world.
Time To Teach: Teacher attendance & time on task in Eastern & Southern Africa
Page Page

Time To Teach: Teacher attendance & time on task in Eastern & Southern Africa

(24 November 2020) There is a learning crisis. Fifty-three per cent of children in low- and middle-income countries are in ‘learning poverty’, i.e. they cannot read and understand a simple text by the end of primary school age. In sub-Saharan Africa, the learning poverty rate is 87 per cent overall, and ranges from 40 per cent to as high as 99 per cent in the 21 countries with available data. Teachers attending lessons and spending quality time on task is a critical prerequisite to learning. However, in sub-Saharan Africa, there is evidence that teacher absenteeism ranges from 15 to 45 per cent.
Worlds of Influence: Understanding what shapes child well-being in rich countries
Page Page

Worlds of Influence: Understanding what shapes child well-being in rich countries

(3 September 2020) Visit our Innocenti Report Card 16 microsite where we dive deep into the activities, relationships, networks, resources, policies and context that combine to shape child well-being with a focus on 41 'rich' countries of the OECD and the EU. The result is one of the most comprehensives studies on child well-being ever produced and a ranking of the world's rich countries on key outcomes for children in mental well-being, physical health and skills.
COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response
Page Page

COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.
Growing up connected
Page Page

Growing up connected

Blanket restrictions on children’s internet use prevent them from taking advantage of critical learning and skills development opportunities, according to a new UNICEF report, launched today at the Internet Governance Forum in Berlin.
Are the world's richest countries family friendly?
Page Page

Are the world's richest countries family friendly?

Family-friendly policies matter because they help children to get a better start in life and help parents to find the right balance between their commitments at work and at home. This report focuses on two key policies: childcare leave for parents and early childhood education and care for preschool children.
Getting into the game
Page Page

Getting into the game

Sport is a powerful tool for involving all children – including the most marginalized and vulnerable – in group activities from an early age (UNHCR, 2013). This report analyses the available evidence on S4D initiatives for children and youth.
An Unfair Start
Page Page

An Unfair Start

In the world’s richest countries, some children do worse at school than others because of circumstances beyond their control, such as where they were born, the language they speak or their parents’ occupations. This report focuses on educational inequalities in 41 of the world’s richest countries.