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Global child bullying problem gaining visibility on the international stage

(11 October 2016) Bullying – online or in person – is a serious global problem affecting high percentages of children. It undermines child physical and emotional health, well-being and school achievement. The repercussions of bullying, for both victim and perpetrator, can continue into adulthood exacting high social and economic costs for countries. This month important international steps are being taken to recognize the urgency and increase understanding of the scope of bullying worldwide.UN bullying reportOn 12 October, Protecting Children from Bullying, a new report produced by the Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) on Violence against Children, Marta Santos Pais, will be presented to the General Assembly. The report represents an important step in formal international consideration of the widespread child rights problem of bullying. The SRSG report reviews global measures to respond to bullying and recommends priority actions to ensure children’s protection from bullying and cyberbullying. A central theme of the report is the urgent need for high quality evidence to support improved policy and practice.  UNICEF Innocenti is currently developing a global database on bullying among 11- to 15-year-olds to support establishment of a reliable global indicator. The database is derived from six major international surveys covering 145 countries and will enable analysis of the prevalence of bullying by age and gender. “In order to accelerate progress in protecting children from bullying it is essential to understand the extent of bullying across countries,” said Dominic Richardson, UNICEF Innocenti’s education specialist. “This database marks an important first step in bringing it all together.” On 14 October the Special Representative's Office is set to further release an in-depth report Ending the Torment: Tackling Bullying from the Schoolyard to Cyberspace. New longitudinal data from developing countriesResearchers at Innocenti have also collaborated with Young Lives, an international longitudinal study on childhood poverty, to produce a new discussion paper Experiences of Peer Bullying among Adolescents and Associated Effects on Young Adult Outcomes. The new study is based on the experiences of 12,000 children in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Viet Nam over a 15-year period. It shows how being bullied at the age of 15 is associated with negative effects on resiliency, self-esteem and interpersonal relationships later in life.The new Innocenti paper represents an important contribution to research on bullying in low- and middle-income countries. The bulk of data on bullying currently available is based on studies in high-income countries. The most commonly reported forms of bullying found in the Young Lives sample were humiliation, social exclusion and verbal taunting. Gender was found to be an important factor with boys at significantly greater risk of physical and verbal bullying, while girls experienced more indirect and relational bullying. Children from poor families and out-of-school children were consistently found to experience higher rates of bullying.“Longitudinal studies are our best tool to understand how we are affected by the constant change that defines children's lives,” said Mary Catherine Maternowska, lead researcher on violence affecting children at Innocenti. “We can go beyond a ‘snapshot’ view to see how experiences in childhood may affect later outcomes. This expands our understanding of both resilience and vulnerability; it is the power of Young Lives’ approach.”As a contribution towards UNICEF Innocenti’s Multi-Country Study on the Drivers of Violence Affecting Children, the discussion paper looks at how structural factors interact to affect everyday violence, including bullying, in different contexts - children’s homes, schools and communities - informing national policies for violence prevention. The study also illuminates the gender dimension of bullying, examining the ways boys and girls are affected by different types of bullying at different ages, taking into account norms regarding socially acceptable behaviours for boys and girls. The paper concludes that the wider social context of bullying can be a critical yet often missing element of prevention efforts, highlighting how bullying often occurs in complex settings where other forms of violence are also present. Peer bullying has often lagged behind other forms of violence affecting children in global child protection advocacy, leading to the risk of underestimating the long-term impact on the lives of victims and perpetrators. UN General Assembly resolution 69/158 on bullying, together with the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, with specific targets on the protection of children from violence, abuse and exploitation, may comprise an important new foundation for progress in protecting children from bullying. With new evidence confirming the global scope, as well as the emergence of new forms - such as cyberbullying and discriminatory bullying targeting minority and immigrant children - there is urgent need for better data collection, increased resource allocation and development of effective prevention models, including for low- and middle-income countries. 
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World experts make recommendations for children’s protection from bullying

Increased attention to bullying and cyberbullying and its impact on children has prompted international efforts to improve actions to prevent and address this phenomenon in the protection of children. In an intensive two day consultation in Florence leading researchers, policy makers and education experts from 19 countries discussed bullying and its impact on children, which will inform the preparation of the upcoming United Nations Secretary-General’s report on bullying to the General Assembly. Bullying is a worldwide problem. Data from 106 countries on the proportion of 13 – 15 year olds who say they have been bullied recently ranges from 7% in Tajikistan to 74% in Samoa. According to this data Pakistan, Indonesia and Peru had bullying rates between 41 – 50% while Canada, France and Russia had bullying rates between 31 – 40%. Themes of the expert consultation covered review of the latest available data, awareness raising, public policies, legislation, child protection systems and the role of education in protecting children from bullying. The expert consultation was organized by the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children, with the support of UNICEF Innocenti.“The protection of children from bullying and cyberbullying is an ethical and normative imperative,” said Marta Santos-Pais, Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence Against Children. “Despite important developments in different parts of the world, this phenomenon is amongst children’s top concerns.” A 2014 UN General Assembly resolution Protecting children from bullying, specifies the Secretary-General’s report should emphasize “causes and effects, as well as good practices and guidance for bullying prevention and response.” A forthcoming working paper on validating a global indicator of bullying in schools using data from 145 countries was presented by Innocenti education specialist Dominic Richardson. “One of the major challenges in establishing a global indicator is the wide variety of terminology and definitions of bullying between regions and even between countries,” said Richardson. “Data on bullying in schools is gathered in all regions of the world and so it is possible to develop a global bullying database to guide policy and monitor progress.” Kirrily Pells (UCL) presented emerging findings from the University of Oxford’s Young Lives longitudinal study of childhood poverty, on the long term impact of bullying on children in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam. According to Pells, “Bullying at age 15 is associated with a range of negative effects on self-efficacy, self-esteem, peer and parental relations at age 19, suggesting potential long-term consequences.”A major focus of discussion in the meeting was the rise of cyberbullying and the nexus between bullying in children’s online and offline worlds. According to data gathered in the 2014 EU Kids Online survey 23% of children in Europe experienced some form of bullying and 12% experienced cyberbullying. According to Sonia Livingstone of the London School of Economics, one in three internet users are now children. She emphasized the need to develop regulations and policies on cyberbullying that avoid punitive measures and find the balance between encouraging the benefits of online participation with the protection of children from risks. A consistent theme throughout the two day consultation was the need to ensure conceptual clarity when describing bullying, to enable progress in its prevention, monitoring and elimination. The challenges and opportunities in crafting evidence-based legislation and institutional frameworks to protect children from bullying were discussed on the second day of the consultation. Legislation should clearly convey how to ensure the protection of all children and fight impunity, while providing the foundation for a culture of respect for children’s rights. George Moschos, the Deputy Ombudsman for Child Rights in Greece shared experiences based on his office’s review of 6,000 cases of child rights violations and 700 discussions with children. According to Moschos: “Children say that violence is a normal part of their lives and that adults are disinterested in what is happening. They tend to ‘punish and finish.’ We need to avoid the easy recourse to punitive responses and train teachers and parents to listen, mediate and stay involved in children’s lives. We also need to lay stress on democratic governance of schools and human rights education, promoting children’s mutual respect.” Schools are seen as a major setting where the various phenomena of bullying are played out as well as the primary arena for effective efforts to prevent it. Two rigorously evaluated and fully elaborated programmatic approaches to school bullying were discussed in-depth during the consultation: the Olweus Bullying Prevention Programme developed in Norway and the KiVa Anti-bullying Programme developed and promoted in Finland.Both programmes have benefitted from extensive data gathering and impact evaluation evidence collected over many years of programme implementation among very large numbers of children in school settings. Common findings highlight the importance of training and involving all school actors, whole school bullying prevention learning and making active, supportive and predictable adult intervention the norm.  Finally, appropriate responses to the significantly higher incidence of victimization based on sexual orientation and gender identity were examined. Accounts of severe victimization, extreme loneliness and almost non-existent support infrastructure for these children were shared. Evidence provided by Christophe Cornu of UNESCO from a number of recent studies indicated significantly higher rates of bullying endured by LGBT youth. The information and outcomes of the Florence consultation will inform the upcoming Secretary-General’s report on protecting children from bullying. The report will be submitted to the 71st Session of the UN General Assembly later in 2016.  (16 May 2016)
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South Africa study on child internet use helps build global research partnership

An innovative new research partnership is set to greatly expand the amount of in-depth, cross national data available on the opportunities and risks of child internet use across the globe. The Global Kids Online project, a multi-country initiative led by UNICEF Innocenti and the London School of Economics, aims to create an international network of researchers and experts through provision of a research toolkit available online. The toolkit is designed to generate robust research to better understand children’s diverse digital experiences in various countries and contexts. The initial phase of the project consists of rigorous, multi method studies on how children access and use the internet in Serbia, South Africa, Argentina and the Philippines.Speaking at the launch of the South African Global Kids Online pilot study in Pretoria, Daniel Kardefelt-Winther, UNICEF Innocenti research coordinator said: “With 1 in 3 internet users being a child, it’s crucial that we establish an evidence base of what children do online and what impact the internet has on their lives. Global Kids Online does precisely this, with a focus on the developing world where child internet users in many countries outnumber adult users.”  “The uniqueness of this research is in the fact that we asked questions both of parents and their children. This is powerful because we can match parent and child data and see how parents’ knowledge of the internet influences the child’s digital skills. “We can also look at what parents’ attitudes to the internet are and see how this influences children’s opportunities to access. We can investigate whether parents’ knowledge of the internet influences what children do online and what risks they encounter.”The findings from the South Africa Kids Online study indicate that one in three children have been exposed to hate speech and inappropriate content online. One in five children has also met face to face with a person they had first met with online although most respondents reported feeling fine about the meeting as most of them were of similar ages.  Other South Africa findings reveal how most children value the internet for learning purposes, but rarely use the internet at school or receive guidance from their teachers on how to use the internet. Parents want to help their children but don’t feel they know enough about how to use the internet to guide them.Anthony Nolan, UNICEF South Africa Chief of Child Protection shared why it was important to understand children’s digital experiences. “Children and young people are leading the digital uptake in developing countries, but this also means that they are more likely to be exposed to negative online experiences,” he said.“UNICEF believes that by understanding how children and young people are behaving in the digital space, they can be empowered to be responsible users.”The South African Kids Online pilot study was conducted by the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention. The study will feed into the Global Kids Online research findings which will be published in a synthesis report by UNICEF Innocenti later this year.  The South African Kids Online study interviewed 962 children, aged 9 to 17 years old, in the Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Gauteng regions about their internet use. Over 550 parents were interviewed in order to find out how they used the internet themselves and how they mediated their children’s internet use.For more information on Global Kids Online visit here. To download the South African Kids Online pilot study, visit here. To learn more about UNICEF Innocenti’s work on child rights in the digital age visit here. (4 October 2016)
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Armenia multidimensional child poverty report launched

UNICEF and the National Statistical Service of Armenia have released the country’s first comprehensive national study on multidimensional child poverty: Child Poverty in Armenia: National Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis. The report offers a comprehensive picture of child poverty in a national context, by looking at multidimensional and monetary poverty and providing estimates on the degree to which the two measures overlap. The research is the first of its kind in the Caucasus region and is based on UNICEF Innocenti’s Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA) methodology. According to the study, 64 per cent of children in Armenia are deprived in two or more dimensions. Nationwide, only 12 per cent of children are not deprived in any dimension. This is true, however, for only three per cent of children in rural areas and18 per cent of children in urban areas. Most children are deprived in the dimensions of utilities, housing and leisure; while the majority of younger children (0-5) are mostly deprived in nutrition.“Child poverty is about more than just money – it’s multidimensional. For children, poverty means being deprived in crucial aspects of their lives, such as nutrition, education, leisure or housing. These deprivations go beyond monetary aspects, not only affecting the quality of their life at present, but also their ability to grow to their full potential in the future,” said UNICEF Representative in Armenia, Tanja Radocaj.There are severe rural/urban divides found in two dimensions. In the utilities dimension: 87 per cent of children in rural areas are deprived in utilities, which is a combination of poor access to water and heating. In the information dimension: 57 per cent of rural children are deprived of access to information, while this is true for only one third of children in urban settings. No significant gender differences were observed in the distribution of deprivation across the dimensions.“This is the first report of its kind in Armenia that depicts the situation of multidimensional poverty, including its overlap with monetary poverty, among children at a national level. With this analysis we can now address a key target of the Sustainable Development Goal 1 and monitor our progress toward meeting this goal,” said the President of the National Statistical Service, Stepan Mnatsakanyan.When deprivation is juxtaposed with poverty, almost one in three children are both poor and deprived. Twenty eight per cent of children are deprived in two or more dimensions, while also living in monetary-poor households. These children represent the most vulnerable section of society and should be prioritized by social policies. Thirty six per cent of children are deprived, but do not live in a poor household. These children need direct intervention to tackle their deprivations and are at a greater risk of being missed by policies that only address monetary poverty.The analysis carries important implications for policy making and makes the case to improve social protection measures, in order to ensure children are protected from risks, while also expanding access to the social services they greatly need. Whether examining poverty from monetary or non-monetary sides, data demonstrates that children are more likely to live in poverty than other groups. Ending child poverty is a pressing challenge in many countries around the world. (27 September 2016)
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Data, research and evaluation experts gather in Florence

Experts in research, data and monitoring descended on Florence this month to discuss their increasingly important role in addressing the latest challenges facing children’s rights.More than 80 UNICEF staff from over 40 countries attended the annual DREAM (Data, Research, Evaluation and Monitoring) meeting June 6-10 on how to generate better and more useful evidence for children’s rights and how to ensure that evidence is taken up and has an impact at the level of policy. “UNICEF is taking its evidence role very seriously, refocusing and emphasising how to provide quality evidence for and about children so that it can be used by governments and other important stakeholders,” said Nikola Balvin, a knowledge management specialist at UNICEF’s Office of Research – Innocenti. “We do that mainly in low and middle income countries but we recognise that as part of the universal agenda of the SDG (Sustainable Development Goals) era, we also need to advocate for the rights of children in high income countries.”A key theme in the meeting was how evidence based research could help inform government policy. UNICEF Innocenti’s chief knowledge management specialist, Kerry Albright argued the case for better evidence informed policymaking decisions. “We need to be realistic that no matter how good the quality of evidence, it is just one of a myriad of factors that are likely to impact upon decision-making.  “That is not to say that we should not try.  We still need to start with good quality evidence; the dangers of communicating bad science are far worse, but to understand the likely limitations of the use of evidence in decision-making when combined with multiple other factors including political realities, expertise, values etc.”She added: “Why is evidence-informed policymaking so important?  Because whilst not perfect, the alternative is far worse: policymaking based on personal opinion and beliefs.  This is absolutely not to say that experience and judgement do not count, but that each of us is susceptible to our own personal biases and beliefs and we need to get away from ‘the cult of the expert’.  It is only by looking at an entire body of evidence, drawing upon formal documented evidence, evidence from citizens and evidence from practice and policy implementation that we can get a more holistic picture.”Other themes at the meeting tackled new tools and methods for measuring child poverty and the role of data in monitoring the SDG’s.An awards ceremony was also held during the meeting at which the best of UNICEF research generated during 2016 was recognised. The three top distinction awards went to a project in Indonesia which helped raise awareness around menstrual hygiene management, a research project centred on child marriage in Zambia and children’s perceptions of hospital paediatric care in West Africa.   Now in its fourth year, the annual DREAM meeting brings together top specialists from all regions of the globe working for UNICEF in data and analytics, research and monitoring and evaluation. (14 June 2016)
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Cooperation agreement with Istituto degli Innocenti renewed

The Istituto degli Innocenti and UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti, on 22 July, formally renewed their cooperation, signing an agreement to work together for another four year period (1 January 2017 – 31 December 2020). The new agreement defines the range of activities that the two institutions will collaborate on over the coming years in order to promote recognition and observance of children's rights on the national and international levels, including joint management of the public Innocenti library.Among many features in the new agreement, a highlight is finalization of terms and conditions for the use of new office premises made available by Regione Toscana and Istituto degli Innocenti for UNICEF Innocenti. The new facilities were agreed upon in a 27 March 2012 Memorandum of Understanding. The facilities, currently under renovation, will become available for use in May 2017 and will allow UNICEF Innocenti to expand its functions both as a global research centre on children and as a convening centre. Over the next few years the Istituto and UNICEF will also collaborate to integrate within the new Museum Degli Innocenti (MUDI), exhibitions that feature displays on global children’s issues and the contributions of UNICEF to research at Innocenti. Cooperation between UNICEF and the Government of Italy at Innocenti began in 1988 when they launched an effort to establish a “new global ethic for children” in Florence. Eventually UNICEF established its international research function at the nearly 600-year-old Ospedale, an institution that can be viewed as one of the earliest efforts by secular authorities to elevate the concerns of vulnerable children to the level of civic priority. (22 July 2016)
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Powerful new evidence on the impact of cash transfer programmes in Africa

Cash transfers have expanded dramatically in the last two decades, becoming key tools for social protection and economic empowerment in developing countries. Until now the rise of cash has been fueled by evidence drawn mostly from conditional cash models in Latin America. In the new book, From Evidence to Action: The Story of Cash Transfers and Impact Evaluation in Sub-Saharan Africa, leading researchers provide compelling new evidence about the effectiveness of unconditional cash transfers—direct and predictable transfers without strings attached to specific behavioral changes—in Africa. The book documents the impressive rise of social protection initiatives in the region over the last decade and highlights experiences of implementing cash transfer programmes in eight sub-Saharan African countries (Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe). “Cash transfers are not only a social intervention but they also contribute to transforming livelihoods and make local economies more dynamic,” says FAO’s Ben Davis, Strategic Programme Leader, Rural Poverty Reduction. “By providing poor households with cash, these programmes also stimulate local demand for goods and services, generating multiplier effects and bolstering local economies.” From Evidence to Action, a joint UNICEF-FAO partnership on impact evaluation of national cash transfer programmes, showcases new, rigorous and timely evidence demonstrating the far-reaching impacts of unconditional cash transfers on the well-being of African children, families and communities. A significant portion of the evidence presented in the volume is based on field research conducted by UNICEF Innocenti.“This book is about how to use the evidence generated by impact evaluations to inform and improve policy and programme design, implementation and scale up, in order to increase the positive impact on people’s lives in sub-Saharan Africa,” FAO’s Senior Social Protection Officer Natalia Winder-Rossi explains.Evidence points to significant impact of unconditional cash transfers on school enrollment, health, food security, and agricultural investment, without necessarily leading to undesirable behaviors such as dependency – a prevailing concern among policy makers. Over the last decade, collaboration among national policy makers, development partners and researchers has led to the expansion of cash transfer programmes and social protection policies across the sub-Saharan Africa region. Most importantly, it has supported the idea that giving cash to the poorest and most vulnerable children, families and communities is a worthwhile investment in their nations' own future.Scheduled From Evidence to Action book launch events will be held in:New York, September 22: Editors will present insights and findings at the 8th SPIAC-B Meeting Johannesburg, November 15: Government Representatives and UN Programme Staff will take part in a Mail & Guardian “Critical Thinking Forum”.On social media, follow all the book events and discussions at: #Ev2ActThe Transfer Project is a group of researchers and practitioners from UNICEF, FAO, University of North Carolina and Save the Children UK collaborating to provide rigorous evidence on the impact of large-scale national cash transfer programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. From Evidence to Action: The Story of Cash Transfers and Impact Evaluation in Sub-Saharan Africa is edited by: Benjamin Davis, Sudhanshu Handa, Nicola Hypher, Natalia Winder Rossi, Paul Winters, and Jennifer Yablonski. Oxford University Press.The book can be ordered online through Oxford University Press or Amazon(21 September 2016)
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Major international conference on youth and gender

UNICEF Innocenti researchers shared recent evidence on adolescent well-being, the drivers of violence and the role of social protection cash transfers in adolescent transitions in sub-Saharan Africa at a major conference on youth and gender issues in relation to international development policy.The Adolescence, Youth and Gender: Building Knowledge for Change conference, organised by Young Lives, on September 8-9 at the University of Oxford, brought together up to 150 researchers and academics to promote dialogue and share the latest global evidence on adolescence, youth and gender and the implications for policy and programming.UNICEF Innocenti social policy specialist Tia Palermo participated in a panel titled Influencing Gender Socialisation in Adolescence and presented insights from a recent impact evaluation of a Tanzanian conditional cash transfer programme in relation to its impact on youth well-being and the transition to adulthood. According to Palermo, Maxine Molyneaux, a professor at University College London (UCL) and a keynote speaker during the conference, highlighted the issue of research and policy gaps related to adolescents.“Molyneaux noted that adolescents are only minimally mentioned in the SDGs, and stressed the importance of putting adolescents on the agenda of research and policymaking related to cash transfer programs,” said Palermo.Molyneaux shared important insights on gender and social protection, including how household-level monetary assessments of poverty are insufficient as women ‘suffer secondary poverty in households.’“This is true also of children,” observed Palermo. “And that’s why Innocenti developed and conducts multi-dimensional poverty among children, known as MODA (multiple overlapping deprivation analysis). Innocenti researchers are also conducting a large portfolio of research on impacts of cash transfers on adolescent well-being as part of the Transfer Project.”Another researcher stressed the need for a “unifying framework on adolescence, similar to that which exists for early childhood development,” a development that been successful in filling research gaps and advocating for Early Childhood Development (ECD)  programming. Key components for such a framework, and noted gaps in the current research, include 1) how do peer preferences and behaviours enter into adolescents’ decision-making processes? 2) What are the intra-household dynamics related to adolescent decision making, and 3) How is school quality produced?”Jacob de Hoop, an Innocenti social policy specialist presented on Economic Empowerment and Children’s Activities and said he gained important new insights on research in humanitarian settings. “Carrying out research in humanitarian settings is more complex than carrying out research in most other settings. A particular issue is that in other settings we would typically prefer to rely on panel data in which households or individuals are observed over a period of multiple years,” said De Hoop.Collecting panel data may be challenging in more volatile settings, as sample attrition is likely to be high. As a result of this and other complications, less is known about appropriate policy responses in humanitarian and emergency settings. According to De Hoop: “There is a real need for expanding the evidence base and for developing research methods that can be used in humanitarian settings.”Research and evaluation specialists, Mary Catherine Maternowska and Alina Potts presented on Understanding the Key Drivers of Violence Against Children as part of a panel on children’s experiences of violence and building a framework for violence prevention. Potts observed: “As someone who is looking at violence prevention and sees adolescence as a critical time, it was notable that no matter what the purpose, a lot of the work building off of Young Lives’ longitudinal dataset ends up addressing violence—because it is so prevalent in the minds and the lives of the young people they are following.Plenary speakers Prudence Ngwenya Nonkululeko of the African Union Commission and Maxine Molyneaux of UCL concluded the conference with a number of important observations. Ngwenya Nonkululeko highlighted “Agenda 2063,” put together by 54 African heads of state and laying out a 50-year vision for Africa, as a challenge for research designed to inform existing regional priorities. Maxine Molyneaux of UCL eloquently summarized another of the conference’s main themes: that “gender and generation must be factored into programme design.” Elsewhere, Innocenti consultant Lucia Ferrone presented on The Evolution of Adolescent Outcomes in Multi-dimensional Poverty as part of a panel on the Impacts of Deprivation and Economic Empowerment on the Well-Being of Adolescents and Young People.Richard de Groot, a consultant with UNICEF Innocenti explored Unconditional Cash Transfers and Schooling Outcomes in Ghana: Heterogeneous Effects for Boys and Girls in Secondary School.For more information on conference activities and speakers visit here. To find out more about UNICEF Innocenti research on the drivers of violence against children, visit here. For more information on Innocent work around cash transfers (The Transfer Project) visit here. For more information on Innocenti work on Multidimensional Poverty (MODA) visit here.(15 September 2016)
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New edition of Research Watch part of global effort on child migration

With an estimated 50 million children on the move in the world today, and millions more deeply affected by migration, the need for in-depth evidence to inform better policy on child migration has never been greater. In response, UNICEF Innocenti has launched a new edition of Research Watch – an online portal for researchers and policy analysts – on the theme Children on the Move. The new edition brings together top researchers, policy experts and children themselves, to explore a wide range of topical research and evidence questions. Children on the Move has been launched in coordination with UNICEF’s new global migration report Uprooted: The Growing Crisis for Migrant and Refugee Children.     “It is a fantastic opportunity to launch a new edition of Research Watch in coordination with release of a major global report on child migration – one of the world’s most urgent challenges for children,” said Dale Rutstein, Chief of Communication at UNICEF Innocenti. “We hope to highlight the critical role for in-depth research, especially involving the voices of children, in efforts to develop better policies and programmes for migrant and refugee children.”After more than a year in hiatus, Research Watch has been completely revamped as digital first multimedia content. It provides multiple thematic expert videos, topical written commentaries, in-depth podcasts and suggested research resources. As always, the content presents the views and experience of some of the leading thinkers on the current topic. Featured expert voices for Children on the Move include Simon Parker, at the University of York, Jacqueline Bhahba, of Harvard Law and Harvard Kennedy Schools, Victoria Rietig, with the Migration Policy Institute, Andrea Rossi, UNICEF social policy specialist and Mike Dottridge, an independent child rights in migration expert. The main research themes highlighted in the videos include: Push and Pull Factors Affecting Children in Migration, Child Migration and the Law, and Challenges in Protecting the Rights of Migrating Children. Two additional videos tell the story of migrant children in Guatemala and Greece. There are also written think pieces on a wide range of child migration questions. Professor François Crépeau, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Migrants on administrative detention of children and Michelle May, of the Harvard Program on Refugee Trauma writes on unaccompanied minors from Afghanistan, Hanne Beirens of the Migration Policy Institute in Brussels writes on EU child oriented asylum policy among others. The podcasts contain all full un-edited interviews with featured experts. Research Watch and the global report Uprooted are key elements in UNICEF’s call for improved global cooperation on child migration on the eve of the 19 September UNGA Summit on Large Scale Movements of Refugees and Migrants and President Obama’s 20 September Leaders’ Summit on Refugees.GO TO THE RESEARCH WATCH PAGE(7 September 2016)
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‘Children on the move’ highlights need for evidence on child migration

After more than a year in hiatus we are bringing back Research Watch on 7 September with a new, more interactive format. Please check www.unicef-irc.org/research-watch UNICEF Innocenti is set to launch the latest edition of Research Watch, an online multimedia portal exploring current child rights research issues. Titled Children on the Move, the edition features in-depth video interviews, written commentary and podcasts on child migration with top researchers, policy analysts and child migrants themselves.   An estimated 50 million children are on the move in the world today, and millions more have been deeply affected by migration. One in three migrants is a child.  “Some of the most serious child rights concerns we face are increasingly linked to migration, and this is true in the countries of origin, along the route of transition as well as in the countries of destination,” said Goran Holmqvist, Associate Director of UNICEF Innocenti.“There is a large literature on migration, but much of it without a specific focus on children. Many vulnerabilities, and also international undertakings, specifically refer to children, so a child migration angle is called for.”Featured expert voices include Simon Parker, at the University of York, Jacqueline Bhahba, of Harvard Law and Harvard Kennedy Schools, Victoria Rietig, with the Migration Policy Institute, Andrea Rossi, UNICEF social policy specialist and Mike Dottridge, an independent child rights in migration expert. The main research themes highlighted in the videos include Push and Pull Factors Affecting Children in Migration, Child Migration and the Law, and Challenges in Protecting the Rights of Migrating Children. Two additional videos tell the story of migrant children in Guatemala and Greece. There are also think pieces on multiple research themes on child migration. Professor François Crépeau, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Migrants on administrative detention of children and Michelle May, of the Harvard Program on Refugee Trauma writes on unaccompanied minors from Afghanistan, among others.  The podcasts contain all full un-edited interviews with featured experts. The 7 September launch of Children on the Move coincides with the release of UNICEF’s major global report: Uprooted: the growing crisis for refugee and migrant children providing key world statistics and policy imperatives on child migration. Research Watch and the global report are key elements in UNICEF’s call for improved global cooperation on child migration on the eve of the 19 September UN Summit on Large Scale Movements of Refugees and Migrants and President Obama’s 20 September US Leaders Summit on the Global Refugee Crisis.UNICEF is mobilizing in all parts of the world to call for the following urgent actions for child refugees and migrants: protect unaccompanied children, end detention of children, keep families together, maintain access to quality essential services, address the root causes of conflict, violence and poverty and to combat xenophobia in transit and destination countries.(31 August 2016) 
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