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The Working Papers are the foundation of the Centre's research output, underpinning many of the Centre's other publications. These high quality research papers are aimed at an academic and well-informed audience, contributing to ongoing discussion on a wide range of child-related issues. More than 100 Working Papers have been published to date, with recent and forthcoming papers covering the full range of the Centre's agenda. The Working Papers series incorporates the earlier series of Innocenti Occasional Papers (with sub-series), also available for download.

LATEST

Factors Associated with Good and Harsh Parenting of Pre-Adolescents and Adolescents in Southern Africa

This working paper presents findings from the analyses of two different observational studies of caregiver-pre-adolescent and caregiver-adolescent dyads.

INNOCENTI WORKING PAPERS BY DATE

178 items found
Inconsistent and unpredictable flow of cash transfers can impact the results of the LEAP programme and its evaluation. The programme did not lead to an increase in consumption, but household debt was reduced and loans repayment improved. Informal social networks gained in strength and reinforced social cohesion and protection helping to reduce risks at the local level.

AUTHOR(S)

Silvio Daidone; Sudhanshu Handa; Benjamin Davis; Mike Park; Robert D. Osei; Isaac Osei-Akoto
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Coordination is a significant issue for the study of governance. Policy and practice in even the most specialized area often have implications or involve relationships beyond the sector, let alone relationships between different units or tiers of administration within the policy area itself. This research explores coordination through the lens of civil registration and vital statistics, with particular reference to birth registration.

AUTHOR(S)

B. Guy Peters; Andrew Mawson
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The ability to correct deficiencies in early childhood malnutrition, what is known as catch-up growth, has widespread consequences for economic and social development. This paper investigates whether nutritional status at early age affects nutritional status a few years later among children using panel data from China, South Africa and Nicaragua.

AUTHOR(S)

Sudhanshu Handa; Amber Peterman
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This paper reports the impact on child schooling and work of the Government of Zambia’s Child Grant Programme (CGP), an unconditional cash transfer programme targeted to households with children aged under 3 years in three districts of the country. The impacts reported here lead to the conclusion that unconditional cash transfers in Africa have significant positive impacts on children’s human capital.

AUTHOR(S)

Sudhanshu Handa; Luisa Natali; David Seidenfeld; Gelson Tembo; Zambia Cash Transfer Evaluation Team
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This study provides the first estimates of national multidimensional child deprivation rates in Bosnia and Herzegovina using the National Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA) pioneered by UNICEF. Amongst the findings of the analysis, it is seen that a reduction in child poverty and deprivation may be achieved by improving both the spending power of households and the availability of services/infrastructure in local areas.

AUTHOR(S)

Yekaterina Chzhen; Lucia Ferrone
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This paper brings together the results of multidimensional deprivation analyses for thirty countries in sub-Saharan Africa. As these thirty countries represent 78% of the total population in the region, the paper also tries to shed light on the incidence and depth of child poverty across sub-Saharan Africa as a whole.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Marlous de Milliano; Ilze Plavgo
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The aim of the paper is to understand how short consumption modules fare relative to a longer and more detailed consumption module in terms of the accuracy of the resulting estimates. The objective is particularly challenging as the use of non-equivalent samples makes it difficult to assess the accuracy and reliability of the estimates obtained.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Luisa Natali; Chris De Neubourg
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This study provides the first ever estimates of national child deprivation rates in Mali using the Multiple Overlapping Deprivations Approach (MODA) pioneered by UNICEF. Deprivations are defined according to the age of the child. Among the findings it is noted that an increase of USD 1 per person per day would reduce the probability of being deprived by 25 percentage points in rural areas.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Marlous de Milliano; Sudhanshu Handa
LANGUAGES:
This paper investigates child deprivation and its relationship to monetary child poverty in the European Union (EU) using the Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA) methodology. MODA provides both a conceptual framework and a methodology to estimate the rates of monetary child poverty and multidimensional child deprivation, as well as the overlaps between these measures.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Yekaterina Chzhen; Chris De Neubourg; Ilze Plavgo; Marlous de Milliano
LANGUAGES:
Mounting pressure from the financial markets prompted most industrialized countries to engage in fiscal consolidation since 2010-2011, with social transfers among the most popular targets. Family benefits have been particularly hard hit between 2008 and 2012. Their real value declined for lone parent households (with two school-age children) earning 20% of the average wage in 20 out of 37 countries.

CO-AUTHOR(S)

Saara Hämäläinen; Yekaterina Chzhen; Jorge Vargas
LANGUAGES:
178 items found