Innocenti Working Papers

The Working Papers are the foundation of the Centre's research output, underpinning many of the Centre's other publications. These high quality research papers are aimed at an academic and well-informed audience, contributing to ongoing discussion on a wide range of child-related issues. More than 100 Working Papers have been published to date, with recent and forthcoming papers covering the full range of the Centre's agenda. The Working Papers series incorporates the earlier series of Innocenti Occasional Papers (with sub-series), also available for download.



Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis for the European Union (EU-MODA): Technical Note

2014


Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis for the European Union (EU-MODA): Technical Note
The Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis for the European Union (EU-MODA) compares the material well-being of children across the EU member states, using data from the child material deprivation module of the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) 2009.



The Australian Household Stimulus Package: Lessons from the recent economic crisis

2013


The Australian Household Stimulus Package: Lessons from the recent economic crisis
As in other developed countries, the recent economic crisis affected the Australian economy. Nonetheless, while the OECD countries recorded a drop of GDP near to 4 per cent in 2009, in Australia GDP grew by 1.4 per cent. An important contribution to this performance came from the fiscal stimulus implemented by the government.



Child Well-being in Advanced Economies in the Late 2000s

2013


UNICEF OoR 2013 -
This paper compares the well-being of children across the most economically advanced countries of the world. It discusses the methodological issues involved in comparing children’s well-being across countries and explains how a Child Well-being Index is constructed to rank countries according to their performance in advancing child well-being. This paper is one of the three background papers written as the basis for Report Card 11 (2013), ‘Child Well-being in Rich Countries: A Comparative Overview’.



Child Well-being in Economically Rich Countries: Changes in the first decade of the 21st century

2013


UNICEF OoR 2013 -
The aim of this paper is to assess the inter-temporal change in child well-being over the last decade. For this purpose, it compares the child well-being index calculated in the Innocenti Report Cards 7 and 11. Although the two Report Cards use the same methodological framework, they differ in the set of indicators used. It is therefore necessary to compute a modified child well-being index based on the common indicators used in the two Report Cards for the countries under study.



Child-responsive Accountability: Lessons from social accountability

2013


Child-responsive Accountability: Lessons from social accountability
This paper links the concept and practice of accountability with child rights, by asking: (1) What accountability means when children are the rights holders, and whose role is it to exact that accountability? (2) What are the assumptions underpinning social accountability, and how can they be revised from the child-rights perspective? (3) How do social and political dynamics at community and national levels, often not linked to child rights issues, shape accountability outcomes?



Children’s Subjective Well-being in Rich Countries

2013


UNICEF OoR 2013 -
This paper is based on background research undertaken for the UNICEF Innocenti Report Card 11 on child well-being in rich countries. It develops a new domain index of subjective well-being based on several indicators drawn from the Health Behaviour of School Aged Children (HBSC) survey 2009/10, which includes life satisfaction, relationships with family and friends, well-being at school, and subjective health.



Cross-Country MODA Study: Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA). Technical Note

2013


Cross-Country MODA Study: Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA). Technical Note
This technical note refers to a special application of MODA, and applies a multidimensional deprivation analysis to a cross-country setting (CC-MODA). The CC-MODA study gives insights to child deprivation within and across countries, and provides an indication on who the multiply-deprived children are, where they live and what aspects of child well-being they are deprived of. This paper offers an in depth explanation of the technical decisions that have been made to obtain these results.



Making the Investment Case for Social Protection: Methodological challenges with lessons learnt from a recent study in Cambodia

2013


Making the Investment Case for Social Protection: Methodological challenges with lessons learnt from a recent study in Cambodia
The focus in this paper is on non-contributory social transfers which are considered to be the main social protection instruments targeted specifically at poor and vulnerable households, and which are financed from general government revenues.



Social Transfers and Child Protection

2013


Social Transfers and Child Protection
The study identifies and evaluates three possible channels through which social transfers can influence child protection outcomes: direct effects observed where the objectives of social transfers are explicit chid protection outcomes; indirect effects where the impact of social transfers on poverty and exclusion leads to improved child protection outcomes; and potential synergies in implementation of social transfers and child protection.



Step-by-Step Guidelines to the Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA)

2013


Step-by-Step Guidelines to the Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis (MODA)
These guidelines present a detailed step-by-step procedure of how to carry out a multiple overlapping deprivation analysis. They aim at providing technical guidance by capturing lessons acquired from previous research, indicating the range of decisions to be made and the various risks each of the different choices may lead to.



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