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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNDER DEVELOPMENT UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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1 - 15 of 1116
Newborn bloodspot screening in the time of COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Ronda F. Greaves; James Pitt; Candice McGregor

Published: January 2021   Journal: Genetics in Medicine

A COVID-19 pandemic business continuity plan (BCP) was rapidly developed to protect the Victorian newborn screening (NBS) program. Here, we present the outcomes of our COVID-19 BCP and its impact on the Victorian NBS laboratory service. Change management principles were used to develop a BCP that included mapping of NBS processes against staff resources, triaging priorities, technology solutions, supply chain continuity, gap analysis, and supporting maternity service providers. The effect was assessed quantitatively by review of key performance indicator data and qualitatively from staff feedback.

Research consent rates before and during a COVID-19 one-visitor policy in a children’s hospital

AUTHOR(S)
Sara L. Van Driest; Sarita M. Madell; Kimberly Crum (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Pediatric Research
The COVID-19 pandemic has already had widespread effects on healthcare and health-related research worldwide. Early phase responses to the pandemic included restriction of clinical care and research to essential, time-sensitive and COVID-related activities in many institutions. With the re-introduction of clinical services, a number of strategies were imposed to minimize viral transmission to patients and healthcare personnel, such as strict limits on visitors/caregivers in pediatric inpatient facilities, which may have ethical implications on family-centered care. This study investigates consent rates for a clinical research study before and after implementation of a one-visitor policy at our children’s hospital.
Increase in suicide following an initial decline during the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Takanao Tanaka; Shohei Okamoto

Published: January 2021   Journal: Nature Human Behaviour (
There is increasing concern that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic could harm psychological health and exacerbate suicide risk. Here, based on month-level records of suicides covering the entire Japanese population in 1,848 administrative units, this study assessed whether suicide mortality changed during the pandemic. Using difference-in-difference estimation, this study found that monthly suicide rates declined by 14% during the first 5 months of the pandemic (February to June 2020). This could be due to a number of complex reasons, including the government’s generous subsidies, reduced working hours and school closure. By contrast, monthly suicide rates increased by 16% during the second wave (July to October 2020), with a larger increase among females (37%) and children and adolescents (49%).
Reopening schools and the dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 infections in Israel: a nationwide study

AUTHOR(S)
Ido Somekh; Tamy Shohat (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Clinical Infectious Diseases
The benefits of school reopening must be weighed against the morbidity and mortality risks and the impact of enhancing spread of COVID-19. This study investigated the effects of school reopening and easing of social distancing restrictions on the dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 infections in Israel, between March-July 2020.
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on maternal and perinatal health: a scoping review

AUTHOR(S)
Bethany Kotlar; Emily Gerson; Sophia Petrillo (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Reproductive Health
The Covid-19 pandemic affects maternal health both directly and indirectly, and direct and indirect effects are intertwined. To provide a comprehensive overview on this broad topic in a rapid format behooving an emergent pandemic we conducted a scoping review. A scoping review was conducted to compile evidence on direct and indirect impacts of the pandemic on maternal health and provide an overview of the most significant outcomes thus far. Working papers and news articles were considered appropriate evidence along with peer-reviewed publications in order to capture rapidly evolving updates. Literature in English published from January 1st to September 11 2020 was included if it pertained to the direct or indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the physical, mental, economic, or social health and well-being of pregnant people. Narrative descriptions were written about subject areas for which the authors found the most evidence. Results: Th
Addressing inequities in maternal health among women living in communities of social disadvantage and ethnic diversity

AUTHOR(S)
Cristina Fernandez Turienzo; Mary Newburn; Agnes Agyepong Agyepong (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health
The response to the coronavirus outbreak and how the disease and its societal consequences pose risks to already vulnerable groups such those who are socioeconomically disadvantaged and ethnic minority groups. Researchers and community groups analysed how the COVID-19 crisis has exacerbated persisting vulnerabilities, socio-economic and structural disadvantage and discrimination faced by many communities of social disadvantage and ethnic diversity, and discussed future strategies on how best to engage and involve local groups in research to improve outcomes for childbearing women experiencing mental illness and those living in areas of social disadvantage and ethnic diversity.
Pregnant women’s well-being and worry during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Forough Mortazavi; Maryam Mehrabadi ; Roya Kiaee Tabar

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

COVID-19 caused some worries among pregnant women. Worries during pregnancy can affect women’s well-being. We investigated worry and well-being and associated factors among pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 484 pregnant women using an online questionnaire. Sampling was performed in a period between May 5 and Aug 5, 2020. Inclusion criteria were having a single healthy fetus and having no significant psychological disorder.

Relationships with caregivers and mental health outcomes among adolescents living with HIV: a prospective cohort study in South Africa

AUTHOR(S)
Yulia Shenderovich; Mark Boyes; Michelle Degli Esposti (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health
Mental health problems may impact adherence to anti-retroviral treatment, retention in care, and consequently the survival of adolescents living with HIV. The adolescent-caregiver relationship is an important potential source of resilience. However, there is a lack of longitudinal research in sub-Saharan Africa on which aspects of adolescent-caregiver relationships can promote mental health among adolescents living with HIV. This article draws on a prospective longitudinal cohort study undertaken in South Africa to address this question.
Common mental disorders in mothers of children attending out-patient malnutrition clinics in rural North-western Nigeria: a cross-sectional study

AUTHOR(S)
Aminu T. Abdullahi; Zubaida L. Farouk; Abdulazeez Imam

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health
Children with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition are managed routinely within out-patient malnutrition treatment programs. These programs do not offer maternal mental health support services, despite maternal mental health playing a significant role in the nutritional status of children. Additionally, the burden of maternal Common Mental Disorders (CMDs) is poorly described among mothers of children attending these programs. This study thus determined the burden and risk factors for maternal CMDs among children attending out-patient malnutrition clinics in rural North-western Nigeria
Simulating preventative testing of SARS-CoV-2 in schools: policy implications

AUTHOR(S)
Ali Asgary; Monica Gabriela Cojocaru; Mahdi M. Najafabadi (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: BMC Public Health
School testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection has become an important policy and planning issue as schools were reopened after the summer season and as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. Decisions to test or not to test and, if testing, how many tests, how often and for how long, are complex decisions that need to be taken under uncertainty and conflicting pressures from various stakeholders. This study aims to develop an agent-based model and simulation tool that can be used to analyze the outcomes and effectiveness of different testing strategies and scenarios in schools with various number of classrooms and class sizes.
A systematic review of technological approaches for autism spectrum disorder assessment in children: Implications for the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Angela V. Dahiya; Elizabeth De Lucia; Christina G. McDonnell (et al.)

Published: January 2021   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities

Screening and diagnostic assessments tools for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are important to administer during childhood to facilitate timely entry into intervention services that can promote developmental outcomes across the lifespan. However, assessment services are not always readily available to families, as they require significant time and resources. Currently, in-person screening and diagnostic assessments for ASD are limited due to the COVID-19 pandemic and will continue to be a concern for situations that limit in-person contact. Thus, it is important to expand the modalities in which child assessments are provided, including the use of technology. This systematic review aims to identify technologies that screen or assess for ASD in 0–12 year-old children, summarizing the current state of the field and suggesting future directions.

What the COVID-19 school closure left in its wake: evidence from a regression discontinuity analysis in Japan

AUTHOR(S)
Reo Takaku; Izumi Yokoyama

Published: January 2021   Journal: Journal of Public Economics
To  control  the  spread  of  COVID-19,  the  national  government  of  Japan  abruptly started the closure of elementary schools on March 2,  2020,  but preschools were exempted from this nationwide school closure.  Taking advantage of this natural experiment, we examined how the proactive closure of elementary schools affected various outcomes related to children and family well-being.  To identify the causal effects of the school closure, we exploited the discontinuity in the probability of not going to school at a certain threshold of age in months and conducted fuzzy regression discontinuity analyses.   The  data  are  from  a  large-scale  online  survey  of  mothers  whose  first born children were aged 4 to 10 years.
COVID-19 and its impact on education, social life and mental health of students: a survey

AUTHOR(S)
Kunal Chaturvedi; Dinesh Kumar Vishwakarma; Nidhi Singh

Published: January 2021   Journal: Children and Youth Services Review
The outbreak of COVID-19 affected the lives of all sections of society as people were asked to self-quarantine in their homes to prevent the spread of the virus. The lockdown had serious implications on mental health, resulting in psychological problems including frustration, stress, and depression. In order to explore the impacts of this pandemic on the lives of students, a survey of a total of 1182 individuals of different age groups from various educational institutes in Delhi - National Capital Region (NCR), India was conducted. The article identified the following as the impact of COVID-19 on the students of different age groups: time spent on online classes and self-study, medium used for learning, sleeping habits, daily fitness routine, and the subsequent effects on weight, social life, and mental health.
While quarantined: an online parent education and training model for families of children with autism in China

AUTHOR(S)
Seung Eun McDevitt

Published: January 2021   Journal: Research in Developmental Disabilities

In the wake of the COVID-19 outbreak, already limited services and resources for families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in China became even more scarce. This qualitative case study highlights one online parent education and training (PET) program developed during the pandemic to offer home-intervention strategies to parents of children with ASD in mainland China. This exploratory study sought to examine the emic perspectives of the trainers and parents who participated in the 12-week intensive training program while considering the cultural context in China and the transnational, remote nature of the program.

Korean mothers’ morality in the wake of COVID-19 contact-tracing surveillance

AUTHOR(S)
Eun-Sung Kim; Ji-Bum Chung

Published: January 2021   Journal: Social Science & Medicine
The Korean government collects and releases sociodemographic information about people infected with COVID-19, their travel histories, and whether or not the patients wore masks. Korean mothers then upload this information on the boards of online groups called “mom cafes.” Based upon a digital ethnography of 15 “mom cafes,” this article examines how Korean mothers understand the travel histories of virus patients and explore the relationships between morality and materiality in the context of infectious disease surveillance.
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UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.