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Children and COVID-19 Research Library

UNICEF Innocenti's curated library of COVID-19 + Children research

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31 - 45 of 5225
Working and caring for a disabled adopted child during a pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Claudia Sellmaier; JaeRan Kim

Published: July 2022   Journal: Child & Family Social Work
Integrating work and family demands can be challenging for families caring for a child with one or more disabilities. The pandemic and its changes to work, schooling and service delivery potentially added to these challenges. This exploratory mixed methods study sought to understand how the pandemic affected adoptive parents' work–life fit and service use. A total of 200 participants responded to survey questions about parenting an adopted child with a disability prior to, and after, the onset of Covid-19. More than half of the parents (59.2%) reported that it was somewhat to very difficult to integrate both work and family demands. Parents with greater access to workplace flexibility and supportive supervisors had significantly less difficulties combining work and family. Families who reported more problems with accessing mental health services, special education and respite care reported significantly more challenges with work–family fit. Parents reported increased stress due to the pandemic changes, but many also shared positive changes such as more time for family. Online services were experienced as effective for some children and reduced time spent driving to appointments. Recommendations for workplace and social service practice and policy supporting adoptive parents of children with disabilities are discussed.
"Wearing a mask won't protect us from our history": the impact of COVID‐19 on black children and families

AUTHOR(S)
Erin Bogan; Valerie N. Adams-Bass; Lori A. Francis (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Social Policy Report
The data on COVID-19 show an irrefutable and disturbing pattern: Black Americans are contracting and dying from COVID-19 at rates that far exceed other racial and ethnic groups. Due to historical and current iterations of racism, Black Americans have been forced into conditions that elevate their risk for COVID-19 and consequently place Black children at the epicenter of loss across multiple domains of life. The current paper highlights the impact of the pandemic on Black children at the individual, family, and school levels. Based on an understanding of the influence of structural racism on COVID-19 disparities, policy recommendations are provided that focus on equitable access to quality education, home ownership, and employment to fully address the needs of Black children and families during and after the pandemic. Research, practice, and policy recommendations are made to journal editors, funding agencies, grant review panels, and researchers regarding how research on COVID-19 should be framed to inform intervention efforts aimed at improving the situation of Black children and families.
Ensuring emotional and psychological wellbeing in children through bibliotherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Sophia Adeyeye; Opeyemi Oboh

Published: July 2022   Journal: International Journal of Librarianship
Sudden lifestyle changes and disruption necessitated by the COVID-19 precautionary measures resulted in children becoming frightened, bored, isolated and anxious which automatically posed a threat to their emotional and psychological wellbeing. These set of children could be helped through therapeutic reading of books. Reading stories provides children with opportunities to gain insight and learn healthier ways to face the uncertainty caused by their inability to do things that they normally do like going to school, visit friends, go to parties, visit parks, visit the library and so on. The study used a prestest - posttest quasi- experimental methodology which lasted for a duration of 10 weeks, the study population were twenty-five (25) within the age bracket of 7-16 years old.
Children's rates of COVID-19 vaccination as reported by parents, vaccine hesitancy, and determinants of COVID-19 vaccine uptake among children: a multi-country study from the Eastern Mediterranean Region

AUTHOR(S)
Moawiah Khatatbeh; Samir Albalas; Haitham Khatatbeh (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: BMC Public Health volume

Huge efforts are being made to control the spread and impacts of the coronavirus pandemic using vaccines. However, willingness to be vaccinated depends on factors beyond the availability of vaccines. The aim of this study was three-folded: to assess children’s rates of COVID-19 Vaccination as reported by parents, to explore parents’ attitudes towards children’s COVID-19 vaccination, and to examine the factors associated with parents’ hesitancy towards children’s vaccination in several countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). This study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive design. A sample of 3744 parents from eight countries, namely, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia (KSA), and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), was conveniently approached and surveyed using Google forms from November to December 2021. The participants have responded to a 42-item questionnaire pertaining to socio-demographics, children vaccination status, knowledge about COVID-19 vaccines, and attitudes towards vaccinating children and the vaccine itself. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS- IBM, Chicago, IL, USA) was used to analyze the data. A cross-tabulation analysis using the chi-square test was employed to assess significant differences between categorical variables and a backward Wald stepwise binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent effect of each factor after controlling for potential confounders.

Knowledge and risk assessment of depression among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Marianna Charzyńska-Gula; Aneta Sabat; Barbara Ślusarska (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Education, Health and Sport

Depression, perceived in terms of a health problem, is a disorder that spreads dynamically in the youth population. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the problem. The aim of the study was to assess the level of knowledge and the risk of depression in the environment of a selected group of young people in the initial period of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study group consisted of 100 people - school students aged 15-20 years. An original questionnaire and the Kutcher Depression Scale for Youth were used. Results: The level of knowledge of adolescents about the risk factors for depression and symptoms that may indicate depression is average. Young people acquire knowledge from the Internet (41%) and TV programs (16%). Symptoms of depression were more frequent in: older participants of the study, those who assessed their financial situation as low, and students who had experience of depression in their family.

Children's experience of distance learning – the everyday life of first graders

AUTHOR(S)
Jolanta Bonar; Zuzanna Zbróg

Published: July 2022   Journal: Studies on the Theory of Education
The purpose of this paper is to present the everyday school life of younger pupils in pandemic times. The rationale behind the study (conducted from the child’s perspective) lies in the conviction that minors are active actors who understand and interpret the social reality around them and, therefore, are the most reliable source of information (for adults) on the meaning of everyday situations for them (Corsaro, 2005). The research material was collected through a focus group interview with first grade pupils from selected primary schools in Poland. This helped the authors understand children’s experience of distance learning. Analysis of the collected material reveals the many and diverse experiences children have regarding e-learning. The study makes it possible to identify the main categories impacting their daily school-related activities, the tangible environment that constitutes the physical space behind these activities, and the accompanying emotions.
Effectiveness of the PlayStrong Neuro-Filial Parenting Program: a program evaluation of an online pilot during COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Georgie Wisen-Vincent; Rebecca Bokoch

Published: July 2022   Journal: International Journal of Play Therapy
This study piloted an online play-based parenting program informed by filial therapy, child–parent relationship therapy, and interpersonal neurobiology during COVID-19. The purpose of this program evaluation was to explore its potential effectiveness in improving child behaviors, mindful parenting, parent–child relationship quality, and protective factors. This study used a mixed method design to gather quantitative data from standardized measures and qualitative data from surveys. Parents of children 4–10 years old (N = 11) participated in 6 weekly 1.5-hr sessions which included teaching a new skill, asking questions, offering support, and sharing video or descriptions about using play-based parenting skills at home.
Essential work and emergency childcare: identifying gender differences in COVID-19 effects on labour demand and supply

AUTHOR(S)
Jordy Meekes; Wolter H. J. Hassink; Guyonne Kalb

Published: July 2022   Journal: Oxford Economic Papers,
This study examines whether the COVID-19 crisis affects women and men differently in terms of employment, working hours, and hourly wages, and whether the effects are demand or supply driven. COVID-19 impacts are studied using administrative data on all Dutch employees up to December 2020, focussing on the national lockdowns and emergency childcare for essential workers in the Netherlands. First, the impact of COVID-19 is much larger for non-essential workers than for essential workers. Although female non-essential workers are more affected than male non-essential workers, on average, women and men are equally affected, because more women than men are essential workers. Second, the impact for partnered essential workers with young children, both men and women, is not larger than for others. Third, single-parent essential workers respond with relatively large reductions in labour supply, suggesting emergency childcare was insufficient for them. Overall, labour demand effects appear larger than labour supply effects.
Effects of an online solution-focused psychoeducation programme on children's emotional resilience and problem-solving skills

AUTHOR(S)
Melih Burak Özdemir; Ayşe Bengisoy

Published: July 2022   Journal: Frontiers in Psychology
This study investigates the effects of a solution-oriented and approach-based psychoeducation programme, initiated in December 2019 and conducted online during the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, on children’s emotional resilience and problem-solving skills. In the world that was closed with the pandemic, children were kept away from the social support system of teachers and friends. Pandemic isolated the children. The negative experiences associated with COVID-19 have placed both traditional approaches and important online learning and support applications on the agenda, since both can help to solve the problems we face. Educators and experts have provided psychological support services, questioning the methods used to reach people during the pandemic and rediscovering alternative ways of connecting with individuals through online media. The online framework of this study emerged in response to the needs caused by the pandemic. The study is designed using a real experimental pattern and is based on a pretest-posttest, experimental/control-group model.
‘Long COVID’: symptom persistence in children hospitalised for COVID-19

AUTHOR(S)
Ali A. Asadi-Pooya; Meshkat Nemati; Hamid Nemati

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health

This study aimed to describe the long-term outcome with respect to symptom persistence amongst children hospitalised for COVID-19. This was a follow-up study of 58 children and adolescents hospitalised with COVID-19. For all patients, the data were collected in a phone call to the family in December 2021 (9 months after the initial study and more than 13 months after their admission to hospital). We inquired about their current health status and obtained information, if the responding parent consented orally to participate and answer the questions.

Differences in sexual health of Mexican gay and bisexual youth and adults during the COVID-19 pandemic

AUTHOR(S)
Juan Carlos Mendoza-Pérez; Julio Vega-Cauich; Héctor Alexis López-Barrientos (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: International Journal of Sexual Health
This study aims to compare and analyze the implications of COVID-19 on the sexual health of Mexican gay and bisexual young and adult men (GBM). It is an online survey with 1001 GBM participants. Information was collected on sexual desire, use of mobile applications, sexual practices during the pandemic, and prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) from August to October 2020. Young participants were compared with adults.
Mothers with justice‐involved sons: Socioeconomic impacts of COVID‐19 by neighborhood disorder in the United States

AUTHOR(S)
Alyssa LaBerge; Amanda Isabel Osuna; Caitlin Cavanagh (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Social Issues
Women, particularly mothers, have faced disparate socioeconomic consequences throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Research has yet to examine whether the consequences of the pandemic vary based on the level of neighborhood disorder, which is associated with various health conditions, including COVID-19 complications. The present study utilizes data from a diverse sample of 221 women with justice-involved sons interviewed during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Negative binominal and logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine whether perceived neighborhood social disorder is related to socioeconomic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and whether the relation varies for mothers with and without children in their home during the pandemic.
Parents' approaches to their children's education and related issues during the COVID-19 pandemic in the Slovak and the Czech Republic

AUTHOR(S)
Gabriela Šarníková

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Family Issues
This article presents the results of the qualitative research and the thematic discourse analysis of discussions of Facebook groups of parents of pupils in Slovakia and the Czech Republic. The aim was to identify how the parents perceived the issue of distance learning during the COVID-2 pandemic and how they approached the problems that they encountered. Parents step into the role of a teacher and of a pupil; they are participants and observers of the educational process and advisors and supporters of their children. They evaluate the educational process from the didactics and the instructive point of view but they lack competencies that belong to teachers. Insufficient digital literacy and lacking equipment in households regarding ICT represent a weak point. Problems linked to the loss of social contacts and isolation are growing in number. Families also struggle with economic and logistics problems.
COVID-19-induced social exclusion and quality of life among Chinese adolescents in the context of family education: the mediating role of perceived control

AUTHOR(S)
Wenjie Duan; Yansi Kong; Zheng Chen (et al.)

Published: July 2022   Journal: Educational Psychology
This study aims to provide insights into the relationship between COVID-19-induced social exclusion and quality of life among adolescents and further examines its underlying mechanism. A total of 2,354 (1,024 boys, Mage = 12.97 years, SD = 1.49) adolescents from Hubei Province, China, participated in this study. Zero-order correlations and structural equation modelling were performed to test the relationships. Results indicated that COVID-19-induced social exclusion was negatively linked with perceived control over COVID-19 threats and quality of life. Meanwhile, perceived control over COVID-19 threats was positively associated with quality of life and partially mediated the relationship between COVID-19-induced social exclusion and quality of life.
The impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the market for childcare

AUTHOR(S)
Diana Weinert Thomas

Published: July 2022   Journal: Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy

This paper assesses the short-term consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on the market for childcare and speculates about potential long-term consequences of pandemic-related policy intervention. The paper uses basic statistics and data to describe changes in the market for childcare.

31 - 45 of 5225

UNICEF Innocenti's Children and COVID-19 Library is a database collecting research from around the world on COVID-19 and its impacts on children and adolescents.

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Each quarterly thematic digest features the latest evidence drawn from the Children and COVID-19 Research Library on a particular topic of interest.
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COVID-19 & Children: Rapid Research Response

UNICEF Innocenti is mobilizing a rapid research response in line with UNICEF’s global response to the COVID-19 crisis. The initiatives we’ve begun will provide the broad range of evidence needed to inform our work to scale up rapid assessment, develop urgent mitigating strategies in programming and advocacy, and preparation of interventions to respond to the medium and longer-term consequences of the COVID-19 crisis. The research projects cover a rapid review of evidence, education analysis, and social and economic policies.